Author: Geoff Livingston

How to Sell in the Digital Age.

Develop a web presence.  It’s important to have a website and include enough information about your company so consumers can make an informed decision.  The next generation relies almost entirely on information obtained online, so it’s best to provide that where it is wanted most. Solicit and publish reviews.  Having customers talk about your business is a great way to build trust.  Advertising can be manipulated but real people talking about what really happened at a business carries the most weight when someone is researching what to buy or who to buy it from. Have quality photos. Everyone has a camera on their phone but product photography still exists because you need a professional who makes your items look great.  People online will judge based on the first impression and if what you sell does not look great, it might not sell at all.  The images of your product can easily be compared to every other image on the internet, so trust a professional who knows lighting, aperture, depth of field, and angles.  What you sell will be compared side by side with your competition. Sell good things.  Whether product or service, the same rules apply to the digital age as the days of trading.  Make something great so people will come...

Read More

There’s an Extinguisher for that

Many people think that when a small emergency fire breaks out, you can point any random fire extinguisher at it and solve the problem.  But different types of materials burn in different ways and therefore might need a special type of extinguisher.  Luckily, fire extinguisher suppliers like Gateway Fire Supplies provide information on the five different types of fires. The first type of fire burns materials such as wood and paper.  These are called class A fires.  Most burning trash is also included in this category, as well as most plastics and rubber. The second type of fire is class B, and it includes liquids.  Class B liquids that can catch fire are oils, tars, petroleum grease, solvents, and some paints. Class C fires involve electricity.  If a power cable overheats or an appliance short circuits, you have a class C fire and need to make sure your extinguisher covers this type of problem. Most A, B, and C class fires can be put out with the same type of extinguisher.  You will see find the extinguisher is labeled by class, such as a 5lb ABC fire extinguisher. Class D fires deal with metals.  You would think all metals are fire-proof but magnesium, sodium, and potassium are flammable.  Naturally, these types of fires are most likely to be found in an industrial setting. Similar to class B fires, cooking...

Read More

Social Media Release Criticism: Nine Points to Consider

The recent release of the Social Media Groups Digital Snippets social media release (SMR) template caused a wave of excitement and criticism, both on and off line. Just to recap some of the posts: Shannon Whitley: “There seem to be more entries in the world of SMNR creation tools, which is great news because we can all benefit from this creativity. However, Id like to throw out a challenge to folks like Edelman, WebITPR, Social Media Group, et. al. Ive been working on hRelease for several months now. Its supposed to be a community effort that will help move...

Read More

Women Snubbed in Top Ten Speakers List, Industry in General

In a blog post listing the top ten social media speakers, The Speakers Group (TSG) listed voices for your consideration. Not one of the speakers was a woman, highlighting a much larger social media services industry problem where women are often overlooked for top speaking gigs, and don’t rank as well as men. Ironically, this topic first came to mind last week when Allyson Kapin a.k.a. @womenwhotech led a spirited DC Media Makers session (pictured below) on the same topic. So when I saw the TSG post, I felt compelled to write. I come to this discussion as someone who...

Read More

Goodness Gracious, Great Blogs of Fire

Stephanie Massler examines how brand enthusiasm impacts media buying on Doe Anderson. Stephanie provides two thoughtful examples and offers five guidelines for an advanced media purchasing framework. These include focusing not on how many people you reach, but in how you are able to connect with your audience. She also suggests focusing on your cost per engagement. Visit Stephanie’s post for her full details and share your thoughts. Is “trading off people’s feelings for page views and Twitter followers” worth it? Jason Calacanis’ email – posted on Calacanis.com – is a power reminder of the importance of remaining human...

Read More